The Crisis at Battle Creek

1882 - 1883

When Battle Creek College closed in the Summer of 1882, the stance taken by Uriah Smith in connection with the situation was particularly painful to Ellen White. Smith's children, who were attending the school, sided with the liberal element and his own sympathies tended in the same direction. During this period an occasional interchange of letters took place between him and Ellen.

She also wrote a letter to the church in Battle Creek in which she explained her concerns respecting the college. She related a vision, where she saw the brethren in Battle Creek and heard words uttered, she wished could be forever blotted from her memory.

During the year that followed the closing of the college the work of Ellen G. White was carefully scrutinized and consideration was given to inspiration-revelation as it related to her experience and writings. Much was published by dissidents to destroy confidence in the Testimonies.

To aid in the crisis situation at Battle Creek, Wolcott Littlejohn had been asked in January to take charge of "District No. 3." The Battle Creek church, with its 497 members (RH, Apr. 17, 1883), comprised the largest part of the district.With a strong base of support in the majority of the church officers and members, Littlejohn began to get positive materials into the Review. On August 28 the Review carried an article of Ellen White, stating that those who are busy in suggesting doubts and creating suspicion are Satan's tools in this crisis.

In the summer of 1883 she traveled to Battle Creek and spoke at certain places to the people, giving and earnest and kind warning to stabilize those who might have been wavering. Then she pressed on to Massachusetts where the camp meeting season began. However, she never loosed interest in what was happening in Battle Creek.

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