Stockbridge Howland, of Topsham, Maine, was an early Adventist believer and on t...

Stockbridge Howland, of Topsham, Maine, was an early Adventist believer and on the acceptance of the Sabbath became a very zealous promoter of his faith. His opposing relatives, fearing that he would come to penury, had a guardian appointed to look after his business.

He bore his embarrassment with Christian fortitude. After a few years Providence intervened in his behalf. A torrential rain visited Topsham and washed out the bridge crossing the Kenebeck river. Howland was known to be and expert bridge builder, so his neighbors and friends tried to persuade him to build the new bridge. But he said, "How can I? Better see my guardian." The result was that the Court set aside the guardianship and a contract was made with Howland to construct the bridge. Many were to apologies that were made when it was revealed that the action taken was really persecution. On the completion of the bridge, the way was open to remove to Battle Creek, where he purchaded a residence at 261 Champion St. In the old Maine home, however, the sons of Eld. and Mrs. White had found a truly Christian home, allowing the parents to remain nearly constantly in the field. Henry N. White died in the Howland home at Topsham in 1863. Father Howland died April 7, 1883, aged 82 years; and his wife, March 2, 1897, aged 91 years. Their beloved daughters, Mrs. H. C. Winslow and Frances H. Lunt also died in Battle Creek and they all repose on the family lot in Oak Hill. "Their works do follow them."

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