Pitcairn Island

A remote British island possession in the southeastern Pacific Ocean, 3,500 miles (5,700 kilometers) northeast of New Zealand. The island is volcanic, about two miles (three kilometers) long and one mile (1.6 kilometers) wide, with its highest elevation 1,109 feet (340 meters). The soil is fertile and grows subtropical fruit, yams, taro, and sugarcane. The population (1994) is 66. The island was discovered by English/ Navigator Carteret in 1767, but it remained uninhabited until nine mutineers of the H.M.S. Bounty and a group of Tahitians arrived there in 1790. By 1800, through drink and fighting, all the men were dead except Alexander Smith (who later changed his name to John Adams). With him were 11 women and 23 children. Shortly after this he was converted through reading the Bounty Bib...

From the Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia. Published with permission from the Review and Herald Publishing Association.