Events

  1. 601. The Noncombatancy Provision

    On March 3, 1863, the Congress of the United States passed a law calling for the enrollment of all men between the ages of 20 and 45; this would form the basis of a national draft. ...
    03. March 1863
  2. 602. Governor Blair's Reply

    The delegation carried back with them the governor's reply, brief and to the point, but adequate: ...
    03. August 1864
  3. 603. The War gets more Intense

    By the summer of 1864 the civil war had become so intense that the General Conference Committee made an appeal for a day of fasting and prayer. ...
    09. August 1864
  4. 604. The GC Committee makes an Appeal for Fasting and Prayer

    During this time the intensity of the war had been such that the General Conference Committee made an appeal for Sabbath, August 27, to be made a day of fasting and prayer. ...
    27. August 1864
  5. 605. Abraham Lincoln Proclaims a Day of of Prayer

    On October 20 the president of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, proclaimed "the last Thursday in November next, as a day . . . ...
    20. October 1864
  6. 606. A Call to Importune God to Stop the War

    The Civil War had to stop. By the end of January 1865, James White addressed the readers of the Review and proposed to invest more time in fasting and prayer. ...
    31. January 1865
  7. 607. The War as a Result of the Crime of Slavery

    President Lincoln, in his second inaugural address, given on March 4, 1865, acknowledged the scourge of the war as a result of the crime of slavery. Here are his words: ...
    04. March 1865
  8. 608. The Devastating War Suddenly Ends

    On April 9, 1865 General Robert E. Lee surrendered at the Appomattox Courthouse in Virginia. The Civil War was virtually over. To Seventh-day Adventists this was the visible answer to prayer. ...
    09. April 1865
  9. 609. Significant Steps Taken in 1864 and 1865

    The Civil War came to a close too soon to test well the provisions made by the government to bring relief to drafted Seventh-day Adventists. ...
    1864
  10. 610. Learning a New Lifestyle

    The lifestyle of the New Englanders in the mid-nineteenth century was not a healthy one. The relation of diet and the care of the body to health and the causes of disease was not realized. ...
    December 1851
  11. 611. The Common Lifestyle

    Many factors common to New Englanders in the mid-nineteenth century determined their lifestyle: ...
  12. 612. The Vision in Regard to Health

    Many matters were opened to her in this vision, but the vision is noted particularly for what was shown to her in regard to healthóthe responsibility of all to live in harmony with princip ...
    06. June 1863
  13. 613. General Counsels on Health

    For the medical world, and for almost everyone, these were days of great ignorance in health lines. ...
    1862
  14. 614. Days of Great Ignoarance

    For the medical world, and for almost everyone, these were days of great ignorance in health lines. Bacteria and viruses were unknown. ...
  15. 615. James on the Food Program

    James White found the food program equally appealing and wrote of it in some detail: The tables are spread with an abundance of plain and nourishing food, which becomes a ...
  16. 616. The Health Reformer

    At the General Conference session in mid-May 1866, plans were laid and implemented to publish a monthly health journal, which Dr. H. L. Lay would edit. ...
    15. May 1866
  17. 617. Two of the Three White Children Stricken

    In February 1863 two of James and Ellen White´s three boys were stricken with diphtheria. Fortunately they heard of Dr. ...
    February 1863
  18. 618. The Desirability of a Health Institution

    As early as the Whites' first visit to Dansville, Ellen had been impressed with the desirability of a health institution for Sabbathkeeping Adventists. ...
    1866
  19. 619. Two More Camp Meetings Planned for 1868

    So successful was the Wright camp meeting in September 1868, that before it closed, plans were laid for two moreóat Clyde, Illinois, September 23 to 30, for the Wisconsin Conference; and a ...
    23. September 1868
  20. 620. Sending Missionaries to California

    At the General Conference session held in mid-May 1868, Merritt G. Kellogg made an earnest appeal to send a missionary to California. After J. N. ...
    May 1868
  21. 625. The Board of the Review

    Actions of the conference included the appointment of Henry Lyon, David Hewitt, and William M. Smith, all of Battle Creek, to be a committee to investigate the financial condition of the Revi ...
    16. November 1855

Events

The Noncombatancy Provision

Governor Blair's Reply

The War gets more Intense

The GC Committee makes an Appeal for Fasting and Prayer

Abraham Lincoln Proclaims a Day of of Prayer

A Call to Importune God to Stop the War

The War as a Result of the Crime of Slavery

The Devastating War Suddenly Ends

Significant Steps Taken in 1864 and 1865

Learning a New Lifestyle

The Common Lifestyle

The Vision in Regard to Health

General Counsels on Health

Days of Great Ignoarance

James on the Food Program

The Health Reformer

Two of the Three White Children Stricken

The Desirability of a Health Institution

Two More Camp Meetings Planned for 1868

Sending Missionaries to California

Funeral Ceremony of Ellen White

Visions concerning Civil War

Rural School Convention

First SDA Church outside North America

The Board of the Review

Pages